Glass artist April Wagner’s work to be showcased at Saginaw Art Museum

Glass artist April Wagner’s work to be showcased at Saginaw Art Museum
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The Saginaw Art Museum will feature the glass work of April Wagner from epiphany glass studio Oct. 5 through January 2019.

The 6,000-sq.-ft. Molten Sensuality: The Crystalline Creations of April Wagner, exhibit will house more than 100 pieces by the award-winning artist and will be a retrospective of her work over more than two decades.  It will include a chronological overview of her glass artwork from the early Volcano and Splash series, to sculptures and wall pieces, showcasing the evolution of custom installations including chandeliers, wall sculptures and iconic freestanding pieces.

April Wagner will create a custom hanging installation for the show, as well as a freestanding sculpture to be revealed at the exhibit. Photo by Les Ward

Many of Wagner’s pieces are inspired by her love of nature. “Everything in nature is beautifully designed and that design serves a function, color, scale and form,” she says.

Wagner will create a custom hanging installation for the show, as well as a freestanding sculpture to be revealed.  Collectors also will lend their pieces to the exhibit to provide a full overview of the evolution of the glass work.

The show will also include a video about the glassmaking process.  In it Wagner explores the many ways glass can be manipulated through its various phases, using 2,000 degree furnaces, applied pressure, gravity and force to create elegant shapes and vibrant colors.

“April Wagner is a world-class glass artist and widely recognized for her incredible talent,” says Stacey Gannon, executive director of the Saginaw Art Museum.  “Her exhibition, Molten Sensuality:  The Crystalline Creations of April Wagner, is one of the most interesting exhibitions we’ve curated at the museum.  Full of color, texture and illumination – it is not a show to be missed.I know that visitors will be taken by the beauty and awesomeness of the display.”

Wagner, a native of Muskegon, developed an interest in form, color, and line in her early childhood. She won a scholarship to a private high school for the arts.  While she initially focused on ceramics, in collage she developed a passion for blowing glass, the website says.​

“I was in love with ceramics, but then I tried glassblowing and realized I never wanted to work in clay again, I’d found the thing I wanted to do for the rest of my life,” she says on the epiphany glass studio website.

Wagner started epiphany before she graduated from college and more than a decade later her pieces are in prominent collections around the world.

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